2nd May Update

There were at least 10 gardeners & interested neighbours at the garden this morning.

Neighbour Giam, who was just allocated a garden bed, came by to tend to his raised bed. He created 2 small netting areas to grow vegetables.

Happy people :)
Happy people :)
Mr. Giam's experimental netting
Mr. Giam’s experimental netting

Neighbour Buganeish brought her 2 girls to help out at the edible garden. They are still really young, but also very intelligent & ask a lot of really good questions! The girls helped transplant some smaller plants to the biodiversity mulch area.

Little girls with big smiles & ready to help
Little girls with big smiles & ready to help

Our herb spiral was filled with green plants, but none of us knew what these plants were. That’s a challenge we face at this totally open edible garden – we sometimes come and find our plants replaced by something else, and we don’t know who did it! We were not sure if these plants were edible, and decided to move the plants out. Some were shifted to the biodiversity area as ground cover, and others were transplanted to small brick opening at one of the wicking beds. (Update: we found out that these green plants are edible vegetables from Taiwan)

Edible plants? We were not sure
Edible plants? We were not sure

The cleared herb spiral with dried twigs used to plan transplantation of herb seedlings.

Preparing the herb spiral for new herbs
Preparing the herb spiral for new herbs

With the recent rains, our raised bed for fruit tree seedlings have started to become overgrown by grass and other weeds. Luckily, mung bean plants were also grown here, and the soil has become much looser over time, making it easier to pull out the weeds. We spent some time clearing out the grass and weeds (they go into our compost heap). Once these were cleared, we started to mulch the area. Mulching can help minimise the chance of grass growth, and also improve the quality of the soil over time. As the raised bed was divided into 2 halves by a gravel area, we decided to do a little experiment.

On one half, we laid out dried banana & papaya leaves to cover the exposed soil areas, before adding several centimetres of fallen dried leaves of the Golden Gem shrub lining the edge of our garden space. Then we added several centimetres of compost sponsored by the park management.

On the other half, we just added centimetres of compost sponsored by the park management. Would there be any difference between the 2 halves?

Neighbour Dennis also came up with the good idea of using our plastic drainage cells and gunny sacks to cover the gravel area so that we don’t have to worry about clearing weeds at this area in future.

Compost for fruit tree bed
Compost for fruit tree bed
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